About a Will to Power: Post-cold War Conflicts and the Politics of Knowledge Production

Authors

  • Zubairu Wai University of Toronto

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.51698/tripodos.2021.51p33-47

Keywords:

New Wars, Third Worldism, contemporary conflicts, knowledge production

Abstract

This paper proposes a critical interrogation of the dominant interpretations of the post-cold war conflicts in order to demonstrate their political nature and how they internalised the causes of conflicts. By internalisation, I refer to the move to locate the causes of conflicts in internal sources. It argues that the region of emergence of the dominant interpretations of conflicts—the so-called new wars— and the internalisation of their causes is the attempt by the West to ideologically suppress or discredit third world anticolonial solidarity and worldmaking. To make this argument, the paper pays specific attention to the broader historical contexts and structural conditions within which internalisation emerged, which it argues are significant for understanding not only the political nature of the dominant interpretations of conflicts, but also the material forces and social processes that informed their production and circulation. In other words, that the framing of the post-cold war conflicts and the internalisation of their causes were never innocent or impartial acts of knowledge production, but political, ideological, and temporal acts linked to power, interests, and specific agenda.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Annan, Kofi (2004). “In Haiti for the Long Haul”. Wall Street Journal (16 March).

Arnson, Cynthia J. (2005). “The Political Economy of War: Situating the Debate”. In: Arnson, Cynthia and Zartman, I. William (eds.). Rethinking the Economics of War: The Intersection of Need, Creed and Greed. Washington, DC, and Baltimore: Woodrow Wilson Centre Press & The John Hopkins University Press, pp. 1-22.

Ballentine, Karen (2004). “Final Report: Program on Economic Agendas in Civil Wars: Principal Research Findings and Policy Recom mendations”. New York: International Peace Academy.

Berdal, Mats and Keen, David (1997). “Violence and Economic Agendas in Civil Wars: Some Policy Implications”. Millen nium: Journal of International Studies, 26(3), pp. 795-818.

Berdal, Mats and Malone, David M. (ed.) (2000). Greed and Grievance: Economic Agendas in Civil Wars. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner.

Bienefeld, Manfred (1988). “Dependency Theory and the Political Economy of Africa’s Crises”. Review of African Political Economy, 15(43), pp. 68-87.

Collier, Paul (2000). “Doing Well Out of War”. In: Berdal, Mats and Malone, David M. (eds.). Greed and Grievance: Economic Agendas in Civil Wars. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner, pp. 91-111.

Collier, Paul and Hoeffler, Anke (1998). “On Economic Causes of Civil War”. Oxford Economic Papers, 50(4), pp. 563-573.

—. (1999). “Justice- Seeking and Loot- Seeking in Civil War”. Mimeo. Washington, DC: World Bank.

—. (2000). “Greed and Grievance in Civil War”. Policy Research Working Paper, 2355. Washington, DC: The World Bank.

—. (2001). “Greed and Grievance in Civil War”. Mimeo. Washington, DC: World Bank.

Cooper, Robert (2000). “Why We Still Need Empires”. The Observer, (Sunday 7 April 2002). Retrieved at <https://www.theguardian.com/observer/worldview/story/0,11581,680117,00.html>

Cramer, Christopher (2002). “Homo Economicus Goes to War: Methodological Individualism, Rational Choice and the Political Economy of War”. World Development, 30(2), pp. 1845-1864.

Cooper, Neil (2005). “Picking the Pieces of the Liberal Peaces: Representations of Conflict Economies and the Implication for Policy”. Security and Dialogue, 36(4), pp. 463-478.

DFID (2004). The Africa Conflict Prevention Pool: An Information Document. London: Department for International Development.

Duffield, Mark (2001). Global Governance and New Wars: The Merging of Development and Security. London: Zed Books.

—. (2007). Development, Security and Unending War: Governing the World of Peoples. Cambridge: Polity.

Fanon, Frantz (1963). The Wretched of the Earth. New York: Grove.

Getachew, Adom (2020). Worldmaking after Empire: The Rise and Fall of Self-Determination. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Gowan, Peter (1999). The Global Gamble: Washington’s Faustian Bid for World Domination. London: Verso.

Harris, Nigel (1987). The End of the Third World: Newly Industrialising Countries and the Decline of an Ideology. New York: Meredith Press.

Kaldor, Mary (2001). New and Old Wars: Organized Violence in a Global Era. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

Kaplan, Robert (1994). “The Coming Anarchy: How Scarcity, Crime, Overpopulation, and Disease are Rapidly Destroying the Social Fabric of Our Planet”. The Atlanti, (February), pp. 44-76.

Keen, David (1998). “The Economic Functions of Violence in Civil War”. Adelphi Paper, 320. London: International Institute for Strategic Studies.

—. (2000). “Organised Chaos: Not the New World Order We Ordered”. In: O’Meara,

Patrick; Mehlinger, Howard D., and Krain, Mathew (eds.). Globalisation and the Challenge of a New Century: A Reader. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, pp. 140-148.

Malone, David M. and Sherman, Jake

(2005). “Economic Factors in Civil Wars: Policy Considerations”. In: Arnson, Cynthia and Zartman, I. William (eds.). Rethinking the Economics of War: The Intersection of Need, Creed and Greed. John Hopkins University Press, pp. 234-255.

Mudimbe, Valentin-Yves (1988). The Invention of Africa: Gnosis, Philosophy and the Order of Knowledge. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press.

—. (2013). On African Fault Lines: Meditations on Alterity Politics. Pietermaritzburg.

Münkler, Herfried (2004). The New Wars. Cambridge: Polity.

Newman, Edward (2004). “The ‘New Wars’ Debate: A Historical Perspective Is Needed”. Security Dialogue, 35(2), pp. 173-189.

Prashad, Vijay (2008). The Darker Nations: A People’s History of the Third World. New York: The New Press.

Reno, William (1998). Warlord Politics and African States. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner.

—. (2000). “Shadow States and the Political Economy of Civil Wars”. In: Berdal, Mats and Malone, David M. (eds.). Greed and Grievance: Economic Agendas in Civil Wars, Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner, pp. 43-68.

Richards, Paul (1996). Fighting for the Rain Forest: War, Youth and Resource in Sierra Leone. London and Oxford: The International African Institute and James Currey.

—. (2005). “New War: An Ethnographic Approach”. In: Richards, Paul (ed.). No War, No Peace: An Anthropology of Contemporary Armed Conflicts. Athens, OH and Oxford: Ohio University Press and James Currey, pp. 1-22.

Spivak, Gayatri Chakravorty (1988).“Can the Subaltern Speak?”. In: Nelson, Cary., and Grossberg, Lawrence (eds.). Marxism and the Interpretation of Culture. London: Macmillan Education, pp. 271-313.

Wai, Zubairu (2012). Epistemologies of African Conflicts: Violence, Evolutionism, and the War in Sierra Leone. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Westlake, Melvyn (1991). “The Third World (1950-1990) RIP”. Marxism Today, (August), pp. 14-16.

Downloads

Published

2022-01-27

How to Cite

Wai, Z. (2022). About a Will to Power: Post-cold War Conflicts and the Politics of Knowledge Production. Tripodos, (51), 33–47. https://doi.org/10.51698/tripodos.2021.51p33-47

Similar Articles

<< < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >> 

You may also start an advanced similarity search for this article.